October272012
September152012
Taken with Instagram

Taken with Instagram

July242012
Taken with Instagram

Taken with Instagram

July232012
Taken with Instagram

Taken with Instagram

March112012
misswallflower:

I remember when I was little, during the summer, I would read in a hammock, just like this and I would imagine that the hammock was really a magical time machine, which could transfer me into a book I was reading.
When I was done, I would get out from the hammock and pretend that I was really in a book. I would play out every scene by myself, using the most unusual items as props, I would see everything around me differently, I could be anywhere and I could be anyone. I was Mercédès from The Count of Monte Cristo, I was Milady from The Three Musketeers, I was George Sand’s Consuelo and every Shakespearean character there is. 
Childhood is so magical, I wish I never grew up. 

misswallflower:

I remember when I was little, during the summer, I would read in a hammock, just like this and I would imagine that the hammock was really a magical time machine, which could transfer me into a book I was reading.

When I was done, I would get out from the hammock and pretend that I was really in a book. I would play out every scene by myself, using the most unusual items as props, I would see everything around me differently, I could be anywhere and I could be anyone. I was Mercédès from The Count of Monte Cristo, I was Milady from The Three Musketeers, I was George Sand’s Consuelo and every Shakespearean character there is. 

Childhood is so magical, I wish I never grew up. 

March92012
“Maybe we should develop a Crayola bomb as our next secret weapon. A happiness weapon. A beauty bomb. And every time a crisis developed, we would launch one. It would explode high in the air - explode softly - and send thousands, millions, of little parachutes into the air. Floating down to earth - boxes of Crayolas. And we wouldn’t go cheap, either - not little boxes of eight. Boxes of sixty-four, with the sharpener built right in. With silver and gold and copper, magenta and peach and lime, amber and umber and all the rest. And people would smile and get a little funny look on their faces and cover the world with imagination.” Robert Fulghum (via misswallflower)
March42012

“I remember the corner.

The corner of your colour, the corner of your smile. The corner where we kissed.

The street corners turning into the corners of the corridor.

Into the corners of the room where we lay.

The corners of your mouth, of your eyes.

The corners of words we didn’t finish.

The corner of your name.

On the corner where we parted.

I remember the corner.”

(Source: misswallflower)

March32012
“The best moments in reading are when you come across something - a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things - which you had thought special and particular to you. And now, here it is, set down by someone else, a person you have never met, someone even who is long dead. And it is as if a hand has come out, and taken yours.” Alan Bennett (via misswallflower)
1AM
“Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass on a summer day listening to the murmur of water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is hardly a waste of time.” John Lubbock (via misswallflower)
1AM
misswallflower:

Paris is the city in which one loves to live. Sometimes I think this  is because it is the only city in the world where you can step out of a  railway station—the Gare D’Orsay—and see, simultaneously, the chief  enchantments: the Seine with its bridges and bookstalls, the Louvre,  Notre Dame, the Tuileries Gardens, the Place de la Concorde, the  beginning of the Champs Elysees—nearly everything except the Luxembourg  Gardens and the Palais Royal. But what other city offers as much as you  leave a train?    
- Margaret Anderson

misswallflower:

Paris is the city in which one loves to live. Sometimes I think this is because it is the only city in the world where you can step out of a railway station—the Gare D’Orsay—and see, simultaneously, the chief enchantments: the Seine with its bridges and bookstalls, the Louvre, Notre Dame, the Tuileries Gardens, the Place de la Concorde, the beginning of the Champs Elysees—nearly everything except the Luxembourg Gardens and the Palais Royal. But what other city offers as much as you leave a train?   

- Margaret Anderson

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